Study and Practice: The Buddha’s Path of Gradual Training

How does the mind transform from a condition of clinging, identifying, and suffering to the knowledge and experience of liberation? As part of the answer to this question the Buddha taught a path of training that unfolds gradually, each step leading onward and supporting subsequent steps which leads to liberation.

In this four-week live, online course, we will explore and practice with two suttas from the Middle Length Discourses [Majjhima Nikāya] (MN 27 and 39) that describe this gradual training. These suttas offer similar versions of this path, but within different contexts.

Our interactive sessions will include discussions, teachings, and practices that help us contemplate and work with the Buddhist path in our own life. This course is part of the Sati Center’s “Study & Practice” series.

When: Four Saturday mornings, Nov 2, 9, 16, and 23, 8:30-10:00am Pacific time

Where: Sessions will be held via the free video conferencing software Zoom. To find more information about Zoom, check https://zoom.us/meetings.

Teachers: David Lorey, Diana Clark, Kim Allen and Ying Chen

Course materials:

MN 27: The Shorter Discourse on the Simile of the Elephant’s Footprint (Cūlahatthipadopama Sutta)
MN 39: The Greater Discourse at Assapura (Mahā-Assapura Sutta).

There are several online versions of these suttas:

(Longer term, you may want to consider purchasing The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha (Wisdom Publications).)

Unlike other Sati Center online sutta study classes, this course will not have study guides, but instead it will provide an opportunity to study and practice with suttas with a community in real time.  Currently, there is not a plan to record the sessions so they will not be available for viewing at a different time.

Technology Requirements:  To participate in this course you will need access to the following:

  • a computer with speakers, microphone and a video camers
    • (tablets, phones and chromebooks are not recommended)
  • a reliable, high-speed internet connection
  • Zoom (free video conferencing software; see above)

Registration: If you are able to attend all four sessions, please register by Oct 31 by sending an email to practicecourses.saticenter@gmail.com with your name and location.  We will accept the first 20 applicants.

Neuroscience and Early Buddhism – Converging Views of the Mind with Rick Maddock

Saturday, August 31, 2019  9:30 am to 4:00 pm

There is remarkable agreement between the early Buddhist view of the mind and the understandings emerging from modern neuroscience. The Buddhist concept of the aggregates (khandhas) could serve as a Table of Contents for a textbook on the human brain. The day’s presentation will review the design and functions of the human brain by exploring modern understandings of its operation within the framework of Buddhist teachings on the aggregates, emptiness, and the mysteries of “not self.”

At the Insight Meditation Center, Redwood City.  Please bring a bag lunch.

Rick Maddock, MD, is a professor of psychiatry who teaches and conducts neuroscience research at the UC Davis School of Medicine. A long-time dharma practitioner with a focus on the teachings of early Indian Buddhism, Rick has completed Spirit Rock’s training programs for senior students and teaches dharma in the Sacramento area and Sierra foothills. His teachings explore the convergence between contemporary scientific insights about the human brain and the wisdom traditions and practices of Buddhism.

Online Sutta Study: Middle-length Discourses of the Buddha with Gil Fronsdal, Diana Clark and David Lorey

Studying the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) Study Course – Part C

A 5-week online class taught by Gil Fronsdal, Diana Clark and David Lorey; October 8 – November 11, 2018

Registration deadline: Sept 30, 2018 (MN-Part C Registration Form 2018).

The Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) is one of the most important anthologies of the teachings and religious practices attributed to the Buddha. These rich and dynamic discourses which include the circumstances and people that prompted the Buddha’s teachings, provide context for better understanding the content and nature of early Buddhist teachings. A careful study of this collection can provide a meaningful foundation for the study and practice of Buddhism.

This class, Part C, is the third of a three-part series of online courses on the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) offered by the Sati Center during 2018.  In this part of the course, topics will include (in addition to an introduction to this key canonical text) mindfulness, concentration, nibbāna/nirvana and wisdom.  Participating in the first two courses is not required before participating in this third course.

The course consists of weekly readings of discourses (suttas) from the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) plus study guides written by Gil Fronsdal.  These study guides function as the “lectures” for the class, helping to bring the richness of this early literature alive (Sample study guide from an earlier course). In addition, there will be teaching videos and audio recordings of the suttas.

Participants will have access to a Google Drive where the course materials will be located and can participate in an online forum to promote a sense of community and learning which will be in Google Groups.

We will be using Bhikkhu Nanamoli and Bhikkhu Bodhi’s translation of the Majjhima Nikāya, The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha (4th Edition, 2009; Boston: Wisdom Publications; ISBN: 0-86171-072-X).

The course is open to all registrants and freely offered (if you would like to make an online donation to support the Sati Center, please use the PayPal button below).

Sample study guides are available to review to get a sense of the nature, assignments and scope of the course.  In addition, we recommend that all participants review the “Introduction” to the Majjhima Nikāya, written by Bhikkhu Bodhi in the course textbook, before the course begins. It both provides a useful overview of the Majjhima Nikāya and gives a sense of the sort of analytic perspective we will be taking in the class.

For more information please email sati.majjhima.course@gmail.com

If you would like to make a donation to support the Sati Center and this class, please use the PayPal button here:



 

Online Sutta Study: Middle-length Discourses of the Buddha with Gil Fronsdal, Diana Clark and David Lorey

Studying the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) Study Course – Part B

A 6-week online class taught by Gil Fronsdal, Diana Clark and David Lorey;  July 9 – August 18, 2018

To register please complete this very brief registration form (MN-Part B Course Registration Form 2018) and email it to sati.majjhima.course@gmail.com by July 2, 2018.

The Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) is one of the most important anthologies of the teachings and religious practices attributed to the Buddha. These rich and dynamic discourses which include the circumstances and people that prompted the Buddha’s teachings, provide context for better understanding the content and nature of early Buddhist teachings. A careful study of this collection can provide a meaningful foundation for the study and practice of Buddhism.

This class, Part B, is the second of a three-part series of online courses on the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) to be offered by the Sati Center in 2018.  In this part of the course, topics will include (in addition to an introduction to this key canonical text) karma and rebirth; training in community; happiness, sensuality and renunciation; and effort in training.  (The Sati Center anticipates offering Part C in Fall 2018.)

The course consists of weekly short videos, audio recordings, readings of discourses (suttas) from the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) plus study guides written by Gil Fronsdal.  These study guides function as the “lectures” for the class, helping to bring the richness of this early literature alive (see sample study guides here: Introductory Study Guide for Training in Community and Study Guide MN 48 -2018).

Participants will have access to a Google Drive where the study guides will be located and can participate in an online forum to promote a sense of community and learning which will be in Google Groups.

We will be using Bhikkhu Nanamoli and Bhikkhu Bodhi’s translation of the Majjhima Nikāya, The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha (4th Edition, 2009; Boston: Wisdom Publications; ISBN: 0-86171-072-X).

The course is open to all registrants and freely offered (if you would like to make an online donation, please use the PayPal button below).

Sample study guides are available to review to get a sense of the nature, assignments and scope of the course.  In addition, we recommend that all participants review the “Introduction” to the Majjhima Nikāya, written by Bhikkhu Bodhi in the course textbook, before the course begins. It both provides a useful overview of the Majjhima Nikāya and gives a sense of the sort of analytic perspective we will be taking in the class.

To register please complete this very brief registration form (MN-Part B Course Registration Form 2018) and email it to sati.majjhima.course@gmail.com by July 2, 2018.

For more information please email sati.majjhima.course@gmail.com

 

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