Practicing Together: The Role of Spiritual Friendship

With Diana Clark, Kim Allen, Ying Chen and David Lorey

Four Wednesday Afternoons, 1:30-3:30; Feb 19, 26, Mar 4, 11

The importance of kalyana mitta or “good spiritual friends” – people with whom we share Buddhist practice and who support us in our practice – is often emphasized in the Buddha’s teachings.  Join us as we explore not only the teachings on this rich topic, but also how we might develop and incorporate them into our lives.  The course will include sutta readings, teachings, small group discussions, guided meditations and opportunities for Q&A.

So that we can send you the course readings, please register by Feb 16 by sending a simple email to practicecourses.saticenter@gmail.com

Study and Practice: The Buddha’s Path of Gradual Training

How does the mind transform from a condition of clinging, identifying, and suffering to the knowledge and experience of liberation? As part of the answer to this question the Buddha taught a path of training that unfolds gradually, each step leading onward and supporting subsequent steps which leads to liberation.

In this four-week live, online course, we will explore and practice with two suttas from the Middle Length Discourses [Majjhima Nikāya] (MN 27 and 39) that describe this gradual training. These suttas offer similar versions of this path, but within different contexts.

Our interactive sessions will include discussions, teachings, and practices that help us contemplate and work with the Buddhist path in our own life. This course is part of the Sati Center’s “Study & Practice” series.

When: Four Saturday mornings, Nov 2, 9, 16, and 23, 8:30-10:00am Pacific time

Where: Sessions will be held via the free video conferencing software Zoom. To find more information about Zoom, check https://zoom.us/meetings.

Teachers: David Lorey, Diana Clark, Kim Allen and Ying Chen

Course materials:

MN 27: The Shorter Discourse on the Simile of the Elephant’s Footprint (Cūlahatthipadopama Sutta)
MN 39: The Greater Discourse at Assapura (Mahā-Assapura Sutta).

There are several online versions of these suttas:

(Longer term, you may want to consider purchasing The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha (Wisdom Publications).)

Unlike other Sati Center online sutta study classes, this course will not have study guides, but instead it will provide an opportunity to study and practice with suttas with a community in real time.  Currently, there is not a plan to record the sessions so they will not be available for viewing at a different time.

Technology Requirements:  To participate in this course you will need access to the following:

  • a computer with speakers, microphone and a video camers
    • (tablets, phones and chromebooks are not recommended)
  • a reliable, high-speed internet connection
  • Zoom (free video conferencing software; see above)

Registration: If you are able to attend all four sessions, please register by Oct 31 by sending an email to practicecourses.saticenter@gmail.com with your name and location.  We will accept the first 20 applicants.

Neuroscience and Early Buddhism – Converging Views of the Mind with Rick Maddock

Saturday, August 31, 2019  9:30 am to 4:00 pm

There is remarkable agreement between the early Buddhist view of the mind and the understandings emerging from modern neuroscience. The Buddhist concept of the aggregates (khandhas) could serve as a Table of Contents for a textbook on the human brain. The day’s presentation will review the design and functions of the human brain by exploring modern understandings of its operation within the framework of Buddhist teachings on the aggregates, emptiness, and the mysteries of “not self.”

At the Insight Meditation Center, Redwood City.  Please bring a bag lunch.

Rick Maddock, MD, is a professor of psychiatry who teaches and conducts neuroscience research at the UC Davis School of Medicine. A long-time dharma practitioner with a focus on the teachings of early Indian Buddhism, Rick has completed Spirit Rock’s training programs for senior students and teaches dharma in the Sacramento area and Sierra foothills. His teachings explore the convergence between contemporary scientific insights about the human brain and the wisdom traditions and practices of Buddhism.

April 13, The Metta Sutta: The Buddha’s Teachings on lovingkindness with Diana Clark

THE METTA SUTTA: THE BUDDHA’S TEACHINGS ON LOVINGKINDNESS WITH DIANA CLARK

SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 9:30AM TO 3:30PM Lovingkindness or metta is one of the central practices taught by the Buddha taught in his Discourse on Lovingkindness (the Metta Sutta), a beautiful poem often chanted. In this day we will study these verses, be introduced to the chant, and learn how loving-kindness is related to insight and concentration meditation. Please join us for a day of lecture, discussion and loving-kindness meditation as we also consider how these teachings can be applied to meditation practice and to our lives.

At Insight Meditation Center, Redwood City.  Bring bag lunch

Diana Clark is a Buddhist practitioner, scholar, teacher, and general supporter of the dharma. She has cumulatively spent more than a year in silent meditation retreats and when not stealing away to go on retreat, she teaches graduate-level courses on Theravada Buddhism at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley. In addition to her graduate degree in Buddhist Studies, she has a PhD in biochemistry and serves the dharma community by being the treasurer of the Insight Retreat Center in Santa Cruz and is on the board of the Buddhist Insight Network.

Online Sutta Study: Middle-length Discourses of the Buddha with Gil Fronsdal, Diana Clark and David Lorey

Studying the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) Study Course – Part C

A 5-week online class taught by Gil Fronsdal, Diana Clark and David Lorey; October 8 – November 11, 2018

Registration deadline: Sept 30, 2018 (MN-Part C Registration Form 2018).

The Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) is one of the most important anthologies of the teachings and religious practices attributed to the Buddha. These rich and dynamic discourses which include the circumstances and people that prompted the Buddha’s teachings, provide context for better understanding the content and nature of early Buddhist teachings. A careful study of this collection can provide a meaningful foundation for the study and practice of Buddhism.

This class, Part C, is the third of a three-part series of online courses on the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) offered by the Sati Center during 2018.  In this part of the course, topics will include (in addition to an introduction to this key canonical text) mindfulness, concentration, nibbāna/nirvana and wisdom.  Participating in the first two courses is not required before participating in this third course.

The course consists of weekly readings of discourses (suttas) from the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) plus study guides written by Gil Fronsdal.  These study guides function as the “lectures” for the class, helping to bring the richness of this early literature alive (Sample study guide from an earlier course). In addition, there will be teaching videos and audio recordings of the suttas.

Participants will have access to a Google Drive where the course materials will be located and can participate in an online forum to promote a sense of community and learning which will be in Google Groups.

We will be using Bhikkhu Nanamoli and Bhikkhu Bodhi’s translation of the Majjhima Nikāya, The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha (4th Edition, 2009; Boston: Wisdom Publications; ISBN: 0-86171-072-X).

The course is open to all registrants and freely offered (if you would like to make an online donation to support the Sati Center, please use the PayPal button below).

Sample study guides are available to review to get a sense of the nature, assignments and scope of the course.  In addition, we recommend that all participants review the “Introduction” to the Majjhima Nikāya, written by Bhikkhu Bodhi in the course textbook, before the course begins. It both provides a useful overview of the Majjhima Nikāya and gives a sense of the sort of analytic perspective we will be taking in the class.

For more information please email sati.majjhima.course@gmail.com

If you would like to make a donation to support the Sati Center and this class, please use the PayPal button here:



 

Online Sutta Study: Middle-length Discourses of the Buddha with Gil Fronsdal, Diana Clark and David Lorey

Studying the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) Study Course – Part B

A 6-week online class taught by Gil Fronsdal, Diana Clark and David Lorey;  July 9 – August 18, 2018

To register please complete this very brief registration form (MN-Part B Course Registration Form 2018) and email it to sati.majjhima.course@gmail.com by July 2, 2018.

The Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) is one of the most important anthologies of the teachings and religious practices attributed to the Buddha. These rich and dynamic discourses which include the circumstances and people that prompted the Buddha’s teachings, provide context for better understanding the content and nature of early Buddhist teachings. A careful study of this collection can provide a meaningful foundation for the study and practice of Buddhism.

This class, Part B, is the second of a three-part series of online courses on the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) to be offered by the Sati Center in 2018.  In this part of the course, topics will include (in addition to an introduction to this key canonical text) karma and rebirth; training in community; happiness, sensuality and renunciation; and effort in training.  (The Sati Center anticipates offering Part C in Fall 2018.)

The course consists of weekly short videos, audio recordings, readings of discourses (suttas) from the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) plus study guides written by Gil Fronsdal.  These study guides function as the “lectures” for the class, helping to bring the richness of this early literature alive (see sample study guides here: Introductory Study Guide for Training in Community and Study Guide MN 48 -2018).

Participants will have access to a Google Drive where the study guides will be located and can participate in an online forum to promote a sense of community and learning which will be in Google Groups.

We will be using Bhikkhu Nanamoli and Bhikkhu Bodhi’s translation of the Majjhima Nikāya, The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha (4th Edition, 2009; Boston: Wisdom Publications; ISBN: 0-86171-072-X).

The course is open to all registrants and freely offered (if you would like to make an online donation, please use the PayPal button below).

Sample study guides are available to review to get a sense of the nature, assignments and scope of the course.  In addition, we recommend that all participants review the “Introduction” to the Majjhima Nikāya, written by Bhikkhu Bodhi in the course textbook, before the course begins. It both provides a useful overview of the Majjhima Nikāya and gives a sense of the sort of analytic perspective we will be taking in the class.

To register please complete this very brief registration form (MN-Part B Course Registration Form 2018) and email it to sati.majjhima.course@gmail.com by July 2, 2018.

For more information please email sati.majjhima.course@gmail.com

 

If you’d like to make a donation to support the Sati Center and teachers, please click the Donate button below.




Clicking the Paypal Donate button will take you to a secure site where you can make a donation by credit or debit card. Paypal accepts the following currencies: U.S. Dollar, Australian Dollar, Canadian Dollar, Euro, British Pound, and Japanese Yen.

Buddhist Meditation Part 2: The Buddha’s Teachings on Concentration with Richard Shankman

JULY 28, 9:30AM TO 4PM In this second daylong we will explore the various ways samadhi (concentration) is presented in the foundational texts, the range of ways it is practiced and taught today, and how to incorporate it into our meditation practice. Samadhi Daylong Student Handout (1)

Bring lunch. No registration necessary.

Location: Insight Meditation Center

108 Birch St. Redwood City CA 94062

Richard Shankman has been a meditator since 1970 and teaches at dharma centers and groups nationally, including Spirit Rock Meditation Center and Insight Meditation Society. He is a co-founder of the Sati Center for Buddhist Studies and Mindful Schools. He is the author of The Experience of Samadhi: An In-Depth Investigation of Buddhist Meditation.

Sept 22. 2018 9:00-4:30 PM Daylong with Ajaan Thanissaro (Geoff) Topic: Craving and Clinging

Saturday September 22, 2018 9:30 AM -4:30 PM

Taught by Ajaan Thanissaro (Geoff)

The Buddha identifies four types of clinging as suffering, and three types of craving as the cause of suffering. But he also taught that, up to a point, clinging and craving play a role in developing the path to the end of suffering. In addition to exploring the role of clinging and craving in the first two noble truths, this daylong course will focus on the strategic uses of clinging and craving in the fourth noble truth prior to their abandoning in the third.

Bring lunch. There will be an opportunity to donate food for the meal offering

Ajaan Thanissaro (Geoff) is an American monk of the Thai forest tradition. After graduating from Oberlin College in 1971 with a degree in European Intellectual History, he studied meditation under Ajaan Fuang Jotiko in Thailand and ordained in 1976. In 1991 he helped establish Metta Forest Monastery in San Diego, CA where he is the abbot. He is a prolific writer and translator. Many of his works can be found online at www.accesstoinsight.org.

Online Sutta Study: Long Discourses of the Buddha with Gil Fronsdal and Diana Clark

Studying the Long Discourses of the Buddha (Dīgha Nikāya) Part 1: Views and Practices

A 4-week online course taught by Gil Fronsdal and Diana Clark;   April 16 – May 14, 2018

To register please complete this very brief registration form and email it to sati.digha.course@gmail.com by April 8, 2018.

The Long Discourses of the Buddha (the Dīgha Nikāya) is a collection of discourses filled with colorful stories, compelling characters and important teachings. In this course on the Dīgha Nikāya we will explore how the Buddha responded to different religious and existential views that were prevalent in ancient India and relevant today, including beliefs about the beginning of the world, what happens after death, and the nature of a “Self.”

Join us as we investigate and discuss the Buddha’s response to views and the specific training he espoused as part of his response in the context of colorful, engaging stories. Specifically, after an introduction to the text as a whole, we will be studying the Supreme Net Sutta (Brahmajāla Sutta, DN 1), the Fruits of the Homeless Life Sutta (Sāmaññaphala Sutta, DN 2) and the Poṭṭhapāda Sutta (DN 9). The course will include study guides, videos and the opportunity for online group discussions.

We will be using Maurice Walshe’s translation of the Dīgha Nikāya (Wisdom Publications, 1995, ISBN: 0861711033) as the course textbook.

To view the anticipated syllabus, click here.

To register please complete this very brief registration form and email it to sati.digha.course@gmail.com by April 8, 2018 using the email address you intend to use to access material on a Google Drive.

 

To make a donation through PayPal to support the Sati Center classes and teachers:




Clicking the Paypal Donate button will take you to a secure site where you can make a donation by credit or debit card. Paypal accepts the following currencies: U.S. Dollar, Australian Dollar, Canadian Dollar, Euro, British Pound, and Japanese Yen.

Online Sutta Study Course: Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha with Gil Fronsdal and David Lorey

The Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) Study Course – Part A
5-week online class
Gil Fronsdal and David Lorey
January 21 – February 25, 2018

Registration deadline: January 14, 2018 (see registration form here).

The Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) is one of the most important anthologies of the teachings and religious practices attributed to the Buddha. These rich and dynamic discourses which include the circumstances and people that prompted the Buddha’s teachings, provide context for better understanding the content and nature of early Buddhist teachings. A careful study of this collection can provide a meaningful foundation for the study and practice of Buddhism.

This course, Part A, is the first of a three-part series of online courses on the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya) to be offered by the Sati Center during 2018. In this course, topics will include (in addition to an introduction to this key canonical text) “Relating to the Teachings of the Buddha,” “Faith and Confidence in the Teachings,” “The Path of Practice” and “The Buddha.”

The course consists of weekly readings of suttas from the Middle Length Discourses plus short videos, audio recordings and study guides written by Gil Fronsdal. The videos and study guides function as the “lectures” for the class, helping to bring the richness of this early literature alive.  Participants will have access to a Google Drive where the material will be located and can participate in an online forum to promote a sense of community and learning which will be in Google Groups.

Sample study guides are available here and here to review to get a sense of the nature, assignments and scope of the course. In addition, participants might wish to review the “Introduction” to the Middle Length Discourses (Majjhima Nikāya), written by Bhikkhu Bodhi in the course textbook, before the course begins. It both provides a useful overview of the Majjhima Nikāya and gives a sense of the approach we will be taking in the class.

We will be using Bhikkhu Nanamoli and Bhikkhu Bodhi’s translation of the Majjhima Nikaya (4th Edition, 2009; Boston: Wisdom Publications; ISBN: 0-86171-072-X).

The course is open to all registrants and freely offered (if you would like to make an online donation, you can use the PayPal button below).

Registration deadline: January 14, 2018 (see registration form here).